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Core Information Fluency Program Plan

Developed at the 2015 ACRL Immersion Program Track

What is Information Literacy?

Reflect, Learn, Connect by Seattle Central Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. https://libguides.seattlecentral.edu/c.php?g=107617&p=697694

Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to "recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information." Information literacy also is increasingly important in the contemporary environment of rapid technological change and proliferating information resources. Because of the escalating complexity of this environment, individuals are faced with diverse, abundant information choices--in their academic studies, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. Information is available through libraries, community resources, special interest organizations, media, and the Internet--and increasingly, information comes to individuals in unfiltered formats, raising questions about its authenticity, validity, and reliability. In addition, information is available through multiple media, including graphical, aural, and textual, and these pose new challenges for individuals in evaluating and understanding it. The uncertain quality and expanding quantity of information pose large challenges for society. The sheer abundance of information will not in itself create a more informed citizenry without a complementary cluster of abilities necessary to use information effectively.

Information literacy forms the basis for lifelong learning. It is common to all disciplines, to all learning environments, and to all levels of education. It enables learners to master content and extend their investigations, become more self-directed, and assume greater control over their own learning. An information literate individual is able to:

  • Determine the extent of information needed
  • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • Evaluate information and its sources critically
  • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally   

HLC Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission 2015 Resource Guide established five main criteria for accreditation.  Library resources and Information Literacy are major elements of:

Criterion Three. Teaching and Learning: Quality, Resources, and Support

3.B.3. Every degree program offered by the institution engages students in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information; in mastering modes of inquiry or creative work; and in developing skills adaptable to changing environments

3.D.5. The institution provides to students guidance in the effective use of research and information resources.

 

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